Online shopping leads to mountains of packages.

July 8, 2019 - Comment

As online shopping grows, so does the boxes delivered to homes across the country. For apartment dwellers — and the managers of the buildings they live in the boxes are piling up, sometimes clogging precious space for days. People are ordering more heavy, oversize and perishable items than ever before, he notes, and building managers

As online shopping grows, so does the boxes delivered to homes across the country.

For apartment dwellers — and the managers of the buildings they live in the boxes are piling up, sometimes clogging precious space for days.

People are ordering more heavy, oversize and perishable items than ever before, he notes, and building managers are “tasked with finding new and creative ways to meet the demand for package storage, sorting, and security.”

Things like tires can be ordered online at discount prices. That means four tires are sitting in the leasing office, along with items like flat-pack furniture and even bed mattresses.

The delivered boxes may be here for days or potentially weeks if you are away on vacation. There are some solutions, but none are perfect. However, locker systems and delivery hubs come close.

There are a growing number of technologies and services aimed at alleviating the delivery problem in apartment foyers.

UPS, FedEx, and Amazon all have begun offering services to help manage the flow of delivery boxes. The Amazon Hub program, for example, includes Amazon Locker, based at third-party locations like Whole Foods; Locker+, with staffed locations for pickups and dropoffs; and Apartment Locker, which accepts Amazon and non-Amazon packages in apartment buildings, among other services.

There are smart lockers, and there are services that arrange deliveries for a specific time when residents know they will be home or let recipients have packages delivered to secure hubs or other locations that are conveniently located and open late.

In some cases, buildings have converted space into package storage rooms and hired additional staff to deal with deliveries. In other cases, they have decided not to accept packages at all, so residents must rely on one of the outside services.

Moreover, the challenge does not end at delivery and storage. Used boxes are shipped back as returns, while others create a trash or recycling headache. According to a report issued in November 2018, over 40 percent of respondents said the large volumes of cardboard and packaging materials had created a waste management challenge.

Comments

Write a comment

*